WRITING

Words I’ve written in the Kennedy School Review, Civicist, and What Works Cities.

 
 
 

service design for policy

A primer on service design in a policy setting: what service design is, how it compares to related fields, and how it is used as part of the policy cycle, with a focus on implementation. Includes a brief on the New York City Office of Opportunity. Originally researched and written as part of an independent inquiry for the Harvard Graduate School of Design (GSD), overseen by Dana Chisnell, Adjunct Lecturer at Harvard Kennedy School and Co-Founder of the Center for Civic Design and Andres Sevtsuk, Assistant Professor of Urban Planning and Director of the City Form Lab at the GSD. A. Quicksey, Medium, September 2018

making stronger connections

Options for cities to promote broadband equity. An internet connection is a gateway to the modern world, but 19 percent of U.S. households are excluded from the benefits that come with being connected. A. Quicksey and E. Broas, Kennedy School Review, May 2018

THE PERILS OF DATA-DRIVEN POLICY DECISIONS

Quantitative data and analysis can help us design better policies and programs, but we have edged alarmingly close to a worldview that suggests data automatically scrubs away ideology and prejudice. A. Quicksey, Kennedy School Review, December 2017

SCREENS RULE EVERYTHING AROUND ME

What my concussion taught me about technology and accessibility, and why accessibility must be part of the conversation in civic tech and government digital services. A. Quicksey, Civicist, August 2017

Finding Your Fellowship in Civic Tech

A guide to civic tech fellowships for those searching. M. Stempeck, K. Shroff, and A. Quicksey, Civicist, August 2017

How Human-Centered Design Contributes to Better Policy

Explore. Experiment. Evaluate. Be delightful! A design approach in the Boston Mayor's Office of New Urban Mechanics that demonstrates design is more than a visual discipline; it can be a tool to achieve policy outcomes. A. Quicksey, Kennedy School Review, August 2017

breaking bread and bridging differences

Three projects tackle partisanship and attempt to reclaim civility in a divided America. A. Quicksey, Civicist, July 2017

Eric Gordon on Valuing the Inefficiencies of Civic Life

A discussion of play, meaning, smart cities and civic life with Eric Gordon, professor and director of the Engagement Lab at Emerson College. A. Quicksey, Civicist, July 2017

INSIDE AN OPEN SOURCE FORCE FOR PROGRESSIVES

The Progressive Coders Network is a dispersed group of volunteers committed to supporting grassroots organizations through new software applications. A. Quicksey, Civicist, July 2017

TECH SURGE: SILICON VALLEY MOBILIZING

Silicon Valley underwent a political awakening in 2017. Catherine Bracy and Derecka Mehrens are harnessing the political moment to engage tech workers and service workers in the fight for a more equal Bay Area. A. Quicksey, Civicist, June 2017

Better procurement, better outcomes: Technology and design interventions in Boston

“Put simply: governments can be bad at buying things, which sometimes makes them bad at serving people,” writes Angel Quicksey, a Fellow who worked with the City of Boston, about the process of procurement. Here she explains the roots of many of those challenges and shares opportunities for improvement. A. Quicksey, What Works Cities, 2016

COFFEE, CULTURE, AND CAPITAL IN AMERICA: STARBUCKS AND THE COMMODIFICATION OF URBAN SPACE

Starbucks' success following Howard Schultz's purchase of the company in 1987 was partly the product of a particular historical moment. This thesis examines a period from 1971 to the mid-2000's, as contemporary observers came to see Starbucks as a symbol of gentrification. It explores Starbucks' character and expansion model from its humble beginnings in 1971. It offers an overview of the various theories of gentrification and neighborhood change, relating them to Seattle, the company's native city, and placing Starbucks within this narrative. It examines Starbucks as a commodity, a place, and a neighbor and interrogates both the critiques and celebrations of the company's role in neighborhoods. A. Quicksey, Scholarship at Claremont, 2012.